Beautiful Lithography Stones

n 2011, while the REI store in the Puck Building in Manhattan’s SoHo
district was undergoing renovation, workers made an unexpected
discovery. Hidden behind one of the walls of the cellar were more
than 100 lithography stones from the building’s days as a printer.
They are now on display on the store’s lower floor.

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The historic building got its name from the magazine Puck, the first
wide-reaching humor publication in the United States, which was
founded in 1871 and moved to lower Manhattan in 1887. It shared
the space, in a mutually beneficial relationship, with its printer,
J. Ottman Lithographic Company. Their shared headquarters was
he largest building in the printing district at the time.

J. Ottman Lithographic Company printed many things beyond the
Puck magazines, including theatrical posters and board games.
Among the works now hanging on the REI wall are a high school
diploma, a certificate of election, and a mortgage bond. Some of
the litho stones are in rougher shape than others.

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Most of the writing and images on the stones is “backwards,”
standard practice so that the final print is the reverse of
what is seen on the plate or stone. Some, though, were
prepared for offset printing, which involves an additional
step between the plate and the final product. The inked image,
prepared “forwards,” or as it would be seen in the final
product, is first transferred to a rubber blanket, reversing
the image once, and then to the final surface, setting it right.

Puck continued to operate out of the Puck Building until 1918,
when it ceased publication. It was known for beautiful, full-color
lithographs and sharp political satire. Statues of the magazine’s
mascot, Puck, decorate the outside of the building.
J. Ottman Lithographic Company shuttered around the same time.
Other printing companies, and even another satirical magazine,
have called the building home since the original tenants left.

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During REI’s renovation, a deliberate effort was made
to repurpose materials from the original building.
Fixtures from the steam engine that powered the
presses are on permanent display, including two
flywheels and the governor. Nineteenth century
I. P. Frink chandeliers, newly fitted with LED lights,
help light the main floor.

 

Source: Atlas Obscura

Beautiful Branding & Package Design

A great brand identity and packaging by studio Eskimo. Roasting Caffè Pagani was founded in 1949 from the dream and the passion of the founder Giorgio Pagani. Roasting is based in is managed by the second generation of the family. They call themselves craftsmen of good taste and the branding and packaging certainly reflect that. The new logo is a metaphor of circular movement of coffee during roasting. In general, the entire roasting process is based on circles, coffee beans always move in a circle. Two main characteristics (time and temperature) have round dials too. Everything is circular and everything rotates. Generation by generation Pagani offer you coffee mixtures of excellent quality. The result of the branding is simply elegant.

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Beautiful Design Stories

It all started with my love for graphic design.

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In my career I started out as a graphic designer then became a marketing manager. However I having always done my own interiors (and for others) and fell passionately in love with architecture as my interests matured and boredom set in. This has led me to a career in interior design which I’ve come to love because it allows me to combine all my interests; architecture, graphic design, photography, furniture design, and marketing into one nice compatible family. Everyone tells me to make a niche but how can I give up one area of design for another? It’s like choosing one child over another, impossible. Combined with an interest in psychology and always curious about why we do what we do, I feel so fortunate to wake up every morning and have something to look forward to.

Which leads me to this fabulous article about other designers who transformed their careers. Enjoy your career and be especially thankful if it’s a creative one!

Beautiful Branding+Design

I adore this branding and interior design by Biasol in Austrailia for Kitty Burns based on a historic story. The concept of Kitty Burns is a tale of two sisters in Australia. The playful character and rich history of the Skipping Girl, nicknamed “Little Audrey” and also known as the “Vinegar Girl” create the concept and title of Kitty Burns. The original Skipping Girl was modeled on 5 year old Kitty Minogue in 1915 when her brother sketched her in a winning competition entry for the vinegar company. An updated version of the skipping girl was recreated a short time later where in fact the elder sister of Kitty Minogue, Alma Burns was used to create the current Skipping Girl seen today.

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Kitty Burns was born out of tying their two names together to create a fictional character – reminiscent of the rich history of the area that reflects the serene, quiet yet playful nook where the spirited sisters liked to skip. Kitty Burns is conveyed as a home away from home for the residents of an apartment complex. A pitched roof design was introduced and incorporated into all elements of the project. The home concept was also carried through into the brand identity inspired by The Skipping Girl story creating a dual personality for the brand. The contrasting elements of the Kitty Burns personality are creatively woven into every design element- Kitty’s fun loving, playful personality, juxtaposed with Burns’ more serious and structured side.

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Beautiful Pop-Up Coffee Shop

There are few things more important to us first thing in the morning than a morning espresso. It’s often the deciding factor in our daily disposition. Can’t think of a better place to get it than from this beautiful little pop-up cafe in Auckland.
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Creatista Café is the brainchild of Nespresso. The space boasts Scandinavian-esque interior, there’s a sofa, lounge chairs and even a dining room table. It’s like sitting in your living room. Beautiful design, branding and product.

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Photography by Helen Bankers

Beautiful Iconic Designs

Ah, the pause that refreshes. One of the most famous lines in advertising for Coca-Cola.

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I don’t drink it often but occasionally it really “hits the spot”.  And it always seems to taste better when it comes out of a glass bottle, yes/no? One of the most famous shapes in the world is the iconic contour fluted lines of the Coca-Cola bottle. Renowned as a design classic and described by noted industrial designer, Raymond Loewy as the “perfect liquid wrapper,” the bottle has been celebrated in art, music and advertising. When Andy Warhol wanted a shape to represent mass culture, he drew the bottle:

“What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coca Cola, Liz Taylor drinks Coca Cola, and just think, you can drink Coca Cola, too. A coke is a coke and no amount of money can get you a better coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the cokes are the same and all the cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.”           Andy Warhol

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How did the bottle become so iconic?
It began with the desire to protect brand Coca-Cola and was a cooperative project between The Coca-Cola Company and its bottlers. In 1899, two Chattanooga lawyers, Joseph Whitehead and Benjamin Thomas, traveled to Atlanta to negotiate the rights to bottle Coca-Cola. The product had been an increasingly popular soda fountain drink established a mere 13 years previously. In fountain form, Coca-Cola grew from an average of nine drinks per day sold in 1886 to being sold in every state of the US by 1900. Thomas and Whitehead wanted to capitalize on the popularity of the drink by bottling it to be consumed outside the four walls of a soda fountain.

And to indicate the power of brand, as of 2015 the Coca-Cola brand was valued at 83.84 billion U.S. dollars.

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