Beautiful Retail Interiors

Nordstrom department store opens inside world’s tallest residential skyscraper. A curvy glass façade lined with chainmail fronts the first location of the new Nordstrom in New York City.

nord 1.pngThe 320,000-square-foot Nordstrom store opened October 24th, at the bottom of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill’s Central Park Tower, which is the tallest residential building in the world.

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Nordstrom worked with design firm James Carpenter Design Associates on the design of the store, which comprises five floors fronted by the undulating glass façade, and two levels located underground. Inside, LED lights are used to light up the glass walls, while chainmail is used as a curtain to shade the interiors from strong light.

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Rather than using walls to segment luxury brands, the team also created partitions from the metallic material. The small perforations allow natural light to filter through the screens, which are then left to drape and gather at the bottom on the off-white terrazzo tile floors.

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Ceilings are 19 feet tall to keep the retail areas feeling spacious and light, despite no windows anywhere else in the store except for the front. Two stairwells flank the entry, and an escalator spans the seven levels with views to all of the floors.

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Nordstrom’s New York store also features a lounge designed by local studio Rafael de Cárdenas, Broadway Bar, and a bar in the women’s shoe section. The store is complete with nine drink and dining options, with the restaurant Wolf open after shopping hours and accessible with a separate entrance. A pizza outpost, seafood café and donut spot are located at the lowest level.

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Nordstrom is located two blocks south of Central Park on 225 West 57th Street and Broadway, and accompanied by a new Nordstrom Men’s Store across the street.

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Beautiful Oddity – Abandoned Turkish Village

Drone footage reveals hundreds of abandoned Turkish chateaux. Hundreds of chateaux have been abandoned at the Burj Al Babas luxury housing development in central Turkey, after its developer filed for bankruptcy, as shown in this drone footage.

Approximately halfway between Turkey’s largest city Istanbul and its capital Ankara, the Burj Al Babas development will contain 732 identical mini chateaux when, or if, it completes. Begun in 2014, the hundreds of houses have been left in various states of completion since the dramatic collapse of the Turkish economy led to developer Sarot Group to file for bankruptcy in November. The complex has debts of $27 million, reports Bloomberg.

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Each of the houses are identical, with the developer controlling the external appearance and buyers allowed to customize the internal layout. The houses, which are being built in the style of mini French chateaux, are all three storys tall with a round corner turret and a square tower above their entrances. They are closely arranged on 324-square-metre plots on a rural site near the town of Mudurnu, as can be seen in the footage above.

 

Beautiful Beach TeePees

Summer time is here and living is easy – well at least in most parts of the world. Not so much is Seattle I can still dream. I’ll keep singing – The sun will come out tomorrow bet your bottom dollar that tomorrow there’ll be sun….

Forget about the classic beach cabin, exit the umbrella: to shelter from the sun at the beach, the essential is the tipi. It is the surfers and bohemian enthusiasts lifestyle who started the trend by planting their tepee on the beaches waiting for the right wave to it. Brands have quickly seized the idea, like One Foot Island or Indoek, who created their beach tipis, easy to carry and anchor in the sand. On the ground, it is of course the must have of the summer to protect young and old from the sun’s rays.
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DIY version at Ikea

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The tipi imagined by WaveWam for surf brand Indoek

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The essential round towel The Beach People

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The beach atmosphere imagined by Urbanara

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The beach teepee of the Australian brand Ginger & Gilligan

Beautiful Mid-Century Modern Reimagined

To meet demand, developers are bringing back the ‘midcentury’ home. The most iconic image of midcentury American architecture is arguably Julius Shulman’s photo of the glass-walled Case Study No. 22 house in Los Angeles, which appears to float weightlessly, almost magically above the city. The appeal of the image—which Time magazine called “the most successful real estate image ever taken” (and which was in fact staged with models in cocktail attire)—lies in the way that the silhouetted inhabitants appear to live in another plane, absent any extraneous furnishings or walls, yet safely enclosed and bathed in the home’s light. The luxury the home evokes is neither gaudy nor accessible; it is desirable because of what and who isn’t there—walls, clutter, crowds, or street. Shulman’s photo and the architecture it depicts have in years since helped stoke a mimetic desire for a weightless, minimalist, perfectly curated life, a desire that now drives an entire industry of midcentury real estate, furniture, and associated lifestyle goods.

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But midcentury modern homes are increasingly rare and can require expensive repairs, while suburban upper-middle-class homes built after the midcentury period, with their thick walls and frequently Southwest or Mediterranean features, tend to be the formal opposite of the Stahl house. With actual midcentury homes out of reach for most, developers and architects are now attempting to satisfy—and of course sell to—this desire with midcentury-inspired construction. But the new midcentury-inspired home does not look quite like the Case Study house in Shulman’s photo. Comparing Case Study House No. 22 and its ilk to new midcentury-inspired homes tells us not just what was so appealing about midcentury architecture, but also what architecture has lost since that period.

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Midcentury modern architecture has been less popular with practicing architects than with homebuyers, since architects are incentivized by their trade and its publications to architect forward, not backward. Several architects I spoke to said that even as the midcentury fervor has grown, many refuse to rebuild the old styles, favoring new work in organic and futuristic forms over repetitions of old designs. According to architect Ray Kappe, who is known for his glassy, transparent midcentury home designs, “most graduates of schools of architecture since the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s have wanted to move architectural ideas forward. They are interested in having their work published in the magazines and books, [and] most publications are presenting other work.”

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Skinner House – Beverly Hills, California

“We would rather design for this era than a 70-year-old era,” says Palm Springs architect James Cioffi, who worked in the ’70s with iconic midcentury architects like Hugh Kaptur and says he is often called a midcentury architect but doesn’t consider himself one.

But even when architects are amenable to reproducing them, certain classic features associated with midcentury modernism are no longer allowed by construction codes. “As we [got] further along in time the thinness of structural elements tended to change,” Cioffi says. “A lot of that was code-driven. We can no longer use 2-inch square columns to hold up overhangs.” That’s only one reason why the seemingly sky-high glass-to-column ratio of the Stahl house cannot be replicated. In California, where many of the most famous midcentury American homes were built, new homes must use tempered glass for windows fewer than 60 inches from the floor, meaning that the midcentury’s untreated, single-pane floor-length windows have been left behind. California codes also require ever-increasing measures for energy efficiency to reduce the amount of solar heat that can penetrate the window. According to Kappe, “In the midcentury there were no energy codes or limits on glazing sizes so the detailing of glass could be simpler and, in my opinion, better.”

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Kaufmann House

So what happens when the market demands architecture from a 70-year-old era? The resort town of Palm Springs was the site of many iconic midcentury developments and is now at the center of a wave of what developers are calling “midcentury modern” homes, though they are being designed and built today. Looking at these replica midcentury homes from the street can be a bit hallucinatory at times: They look like something out of a photograph from the 1960s, except that everything is smoother, thicker, and brighter, with perfectly sculpted desert landscaping and hardscaping out front in place of the midcentury’s well-watered green lawns.

The degree to which new midcentury developments attempt to remain faithful to midcentury models varies. “It’s a choice between whether you want 70 percent midcentury with a contemporary inspiration, or 70 percent contemporary with a midcentury inspiration,” said Tyson Hawley, an agent with KUD Properties, who is developing a collection of houses in Palm Springs called the Desert Eichlers.

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The Desert Palisades

Unlike most of the midcentury replicas that are on the market, the Eichlers are based on original midcentury plans—for developer Joseph Eichler’s Bay Area tract homes—and the final product adheres fairly closely to the original Eichler look, with a living plan surrounding a glass atrium that provides views between several living spaces. Even the thin roofs of the original Eichlers appear to be replicated, although according to developer Troy Kudlac, that appearance is more a matter of proportion than fact. “The original Eichlers were tongue-and-groove with a rolled roof right on top; ours have several layers consisting of foil, plywood, insulation, and foam,” he says. “But they look thin compared to the other midcentury replicas around that are thicker.”

Like other new “midcentury” developments, the Desert Eichlers have a kind of technicolor perfection that differs from the more muted, sunlight-tempered hues of original midcentury homes, utilizing brightly stained wooden ceilings and a new “Eichler” multicolor paint palette co-branded with Dunn-Edwards. The reinterpreted Alexander Construction Company homes that James Cioffi built in 2014 have a similar hyperreal look, like the Palm Springs originals but brighter and weightier: The architecture is nearly identical, but the roofs are higher and thicker to accommodate energy efficiency and a modern desire for higher ceilings. Cioffi’s Alexander homes, unlike the original Alexanders or the new Desert Eichlers, also produce their own solar energy.

The “midcentury modern-inspired” Skye development, also in Palm Springs, creates a less faithful, larger-than-midcentury look that incorporates elements of midcentury design into a contemporary format. In Skye, the ceilings are higher and the rooms are larger than in a midcentury home, but in midcentury fashion, the great room features a slanted roof, an articulated brick fireplace, and a wet bar with views onto the pool. Skye’s preponderance of white tile, white walls, and white beams is in contrast with the more mod, bright accent colors at the Desert Eichler and new Alexander developments, but remains brighter than the original, sun-faded midcentury homes, which seem sepia toned in contrast.

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The Skye development

Kaptur Court is a complex of three homes designed by Hugh Kaptur, the architect of many of Palm Springs’ most iconic midcentury and late modernist buildings. Kaptur Court in Palm Springs makes faithful use of midcentury accent materials like rock-faced walls, square concrete brick, and clerestory windows; however, the heft of the walls and roofline are clearly of the contemporary era. This heft, in service of insulation and energy efficiency, is perhaps the biggest reason why new homes, however “midcentury modern” inspired, can never quite assume the elegance of the Case Study houses. And of course, while Skye, Kaptur Court, and the Desert Eichlers all deploy abundant glass panes to achieve Palm Springs’ requisite “indoor/outdoor” feeling, the use of glass remains limited to areas like patio sliders and windows, rather than entire lengths of the home.

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The Skye development

New “midcentury modern” homes have developed their own dialect for midcentury modern design, raising the question of what the phrase “midcentury modern” means in a contemporary context. If it can’t mean the specific form of Case Study No. 22 and similar architecturally obsolete glass boxes, “midcentury modern” then must become a way of trying to capture the feeling the images from the period inspire. What the Shulman photo depicts beyond the architecture itself are two women in party dresses, appearing to be in animated conversation, surrounded by slim furniture as lightweight in appearance as the home itself. Beyond our insatiable desire to live in floating glass homes, what the Shulman photo engendered is a sense that midcentury modern means effervescent social life, perfectly dressed and curated and yet also apparently at ease, like the women in the photo.

To buy a new “midcentury modern” home, then, is to buy a vision of oneself in such composed yet carefree happiness. What one can’t achieve in full glass walls one can approximate with minimalist decor and large, open entertaining spaces. This is what the new “midcentury modern” developments are building and selling: not necessarily replicas, but homes focused around large, airy entertainment space, with clean angles and unadorned edges in place of what in recent decades were curvy, decorated facades. The new “midcentury modern” housing development, in addition to recreating the sparkling, effortless cocktail vibe associated with the period, is about creating a home that in its sleek, minimalist, sparsely decorated lines works hard to make the viewer imagine that the more ornate ’80s, ’90s, and 2000s never happened.

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Beautiful Magical Staircase and Interiors

Strathmore House, by InForm Design, is richly textured with amazingly beautiful detailing. This gorgeous residence features a lofty side entrance where a large herringbone pivot door opens to reveal an eye-catching sculptural, magical, spiral staircase. I am obsessed with this staircase – simple elegance personified. And that herringbone pattern – swooning over.

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Gorgeous pivot door!

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Inside, a palette of luxurious marble, timber and brass awaits, creating a balance of warmth and drama that is juxtaposed by subtle injections of light marble, putty greys, and crisp whites. Inspired by the home’s robust exterior blend of concrete and black steel, the rich material palette was carefully chosen to create harmony between the indoor and outdoor spaces.

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Marble and timber elements carry through to the elegant open plan living areas, providing a warm and textural backdrop for the beautiful furnishings, lighting and artwork. These include the iconic Beetle dining chairs by Gubi and Platner arm chairs by Knoll. 

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Known for their unique, considered design, InForm have thoughtfully created the home to meet the needs of a busy family. The incredible staircase leads up to the bedrooms, where the generous master suite features a calming palette of soft greys, and delicate textile elements. The grey hues carry through to the bathroom with a tactile mix of marble surfaces, mosaic tiles and brass accents. The gorgeous Workstead Signal Pendant illuminates the space.

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Photography by James Geer

Beautiful Interior Design

Today’s inspiration comes from this truly magical project called Melfort Townhouse by Conrad Architects. The exquisite restrained materials palette and minimal aesthetic creates a timeless and elegant interior. The result of this exacting approach is the creation of elegant, refined residences that unites characteristics of classic architecture with an aesthetic that is at once sophisticated and distinguished. Defined by outstanding quality, this project is approached independently yet unified by a design philosophy that seeks to create a lasting impact through architectural and interior design excellence.

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Celebrated for an exacting approach to the creation of refined, elegant residences, the practice demonstrates a respect for the long tradition of architecture while taking a holistic approach to the design process. This new project exemplifies Conrad Architect’s commitment to pursuing architecture that is classically minimal and restrained, yet layered with a depth of emotion, sensitively balancing the heritage and the contemporary.

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A grand Georgian-style residence (circa 1935), Melfort is reimagined by Conrad Architects as five townhouses with a deep respect for site heritage and context. The richness of character that has developed over time – Georgian style – is characterized by balance. The symmetrical with classical proportions, and ornamentation is used sparingly.

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The interior design was approached with a distinctly European sensibility, showcasing restraint, yet with moments of fine detailing. A soft, neutral palette is expressed through oak flooring and kitchen joinery, with beautiful Cararra marble used throughout kitchens, bathrooms and ornate fireplaces. Joinery was consciously conceived as distinct furniture pieces, reading as contemporary furniture elements within a historical interior.

With a beautifully curated selection of furniture and lighting throughout, the two living areas have a luxurious feel, with rich texture and classic detailing. The one above features the Tom Verellen Thibaut XL Sofa in white linen upholstery and Geta coffee table by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Galerie kreo. The incredible light that hangs above is the Studio Arrow pendant in brass and calfskin by Apparatus. In the living room, the wonderful curves of the Mass Productions Dandy Sofa is offset by the square lines of the two Gerrit Rietveld Utrecht Chairs. The Kelly Wearstler Tribute Stool and artwork by Richard Serra give the space a graphic touch, while rugs by Armadillo & Co give both rooms further warmth and texture.

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While a common design language was employed throughout, the layering of Georgian detailing was omitted from the new structure to avoid any sense of reproduction.

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The elegant aesthetic continues through to an inviting outdoor area which is furnished with stunning pieces by Vincent Van DuysenB&B Italia and Minotti. With incredible renders created by Third Aesthetic, it will be wonderful to see this incredible project come to life.

Images courtesy of Conrad Architects 

Beautiful Tiny Tower

And you thought your lot was skinny? ISA’s Tiny Tower residence fills leftover plot in Philadelphia.
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Pennsylvania architecture studio ISA has designed a slender 5 story house in a developing Philadelphia neighborhood, as a housing prototype for tiny vacant lots.

ISA’s narrow Tiny Tower is built like a mini-skyscraper, using a steel-reinforced wood frame that is clad in painted metal across its exterior. Windows take up large portions of the street facade.

2tiny-tower-isa-architecture-residential-philadelphia-pennsylvania-usa_dezeen_2364_col_7Each of the levels is designed to suit different functions, with the floor space totaling 1,250 square feet (116 sq. meters).

Utilizing compact vertical circulation, Tiny Tower maximizes the entire property’s footprint in both length and height. The house is 12 feet (3.6 meters) wide, 29 feet (8.8 meters) deep, and 38 feet (11.5 meters) tall.

The project is located in Philadelphia’s Brewerytown, which is currently undergoing revitalization as new buildings infill vacant lots.

3tiny-tower-isa-architecture-residential-philadelphia-pennsylvania-usa_dezeen_2364_col_6Tiny Tower serves as a prototype for flexible-use buildings on small urban plots. Early waves of redevelopment tend to take advantage of sites with standard dimensions, but the area’s urban grid includes many under-utilized extra small parcels facing alley streets.

99tiny-tower-isa-architecture-residential-philadelphia-pennsylvania-usa_dezeen_2364_col_2The tiered structured stands out from its neighbors, which include parking lots and the gardens of adjacent houses. Rather than a yard, Tiny Tower features a lower level window garden, a second level walk out terrace and a roof deck. The design promotes vertical living for both indoor and outdoor space. The ground floor sits slightly below grade, so the building’s height is not too obtrusive on the surroundings. A further basement level allows for enough living space within the volume squeezed onto the tight plot.

6tiny-tower-isa-architecture-residential-philadelphia-pennsylvania-usa_dezeen_2364_col_35tiny-tower-isa-architecture-residential-philadelphia-pennsylvania-usa_dezeen_2364_col_1Unlocking the development potential of these tiny sites is critical as the city looks to increase its supply of low-cost housing for a diverse range of lifestyles. A folded-plate steel staircase at the front of the house connects all five levels, while a separate exterior stair provides access to the roof.

4tiny-tower-isa-architecture-residential-philadelphia-pennsylvania-usa_dezeen_2364_col_5The lowest level accommodates a kitchen and bathroom. Above, the main entrance opens to the living room a few steps down. The third floor is used as an office, with two desks across from one another and a small balcony.

The top two stories each house a bedroom and bathroom, and the roof terrace provides extra living space when the weather is nice.

White walls, light wood floors and ample natural light create an airy backdrop inside. All-white furnishings are used sparingly, for a spacious rather than cramped feel.

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11 tiny-tower-isa-architecture-residential-philadelphia-pennsylvania-usa_dezeen_2364_floor-diagrams.jpgISA has also created two other residential projects in Philadelphia: a white townhouse with a plywood core and a housing complex clad in brick, wood and metal.

As land in cities becomes increasingly scarce, architects are coming up with clever solutions to fill in any urban gaps. Other houses that make the most of their tiny plots include a “starter” home with a jagged roofline in New Orleans by OJT, a white house in Brasília by Bloco Arquitetos, and a gabled black residence in Vancouver by D’Arcy Jones Architecture.

Photography is by Sam Oberter
Article Bridget Cogley for Dezeen