Beautiful Kitchen Design

With roots in Scandinavian design, Nordiska Kök designs beautiful minimalist kitchens to live in, unique and tailor-made to suit your life, today and tomorrow. Creators of tailor-made kitchens, the company offers unique solutions to suit different lifestyles. Built with longevity in mind, the kitchens are not only designed to last, they also leave the lightest possible footprint on world resources. I am immediately drawn to its warm inviting palette, mix of natural materials and interesting textures. Nordiska Kök crated this beautiful, classic Shaker kitchen with a Scandinavian touch, it fits like a dream inside of the century apartment,  located in the popular Copenhagen district of Frederiksberg.
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The spacious kitchen reflects the quality craftsmanship and clean lines that is synonymous with the Shaker movement. Together with the apartment’s preserved detailing, including the flooring and ceiling stucco, the overall look is truly timeless. Soft grey tones and beautiful Emperador marble counter tops compliment the warm wood flooring, while luxurious handles by The Brandt provide a contemporary edge.
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3Staying true to the minimalist aesthetic of the space, the decision not to cover the entire wall with cupboards is also in keeping with the style of Shaker kitchens. The kitchen demonstrates beautiful attention to detail, as can be seen inside the cabinets and drawers, which feature a warm white pigmented oak.
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The kitchen island not only grounds the space and makes the room dynamic, it adds functionality and plenty of storage. As the heart of the kitchen, it also provides the perfect place for friends and family to gather.
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Styling by Marie Graunbøl / Photography by Andrea Papini
Images Nordiska Kök

Beautiful Mid-Century Renovation

I love the before and after image of this mid-century modern home renovated by Nest Architects. The home now has a chance to live another life. The beams are a fantastic architectural statement and at the same time giving the house volume and openness. The built in bench on the wall is a nice addition. If you haven’t heard of Nest you should go check them out, they have some great renovations.

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The home is a high-quality example of late 1950’s era residential architecture that was in disrepair. The client’s vision to salvage the house and restore the existing architectural details guided the renovation. The original home features iconic roof geometry, exposed beams, and large expanses of glass that address the views. Strong datum lines emphasize the horizontality of the home’s massing and views of the low-lying landscape.

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Beautiful Villa Savoye

As a monument to modernism, the building possesses a poetry and sensitivity full of idealism. The careful composition of living space and intention to harness natural light, not to mention the building’s iconic aesthetic, still define modern architecture.

villasavoye_landscapeThe Villa Savoye, built in 1929 in Poissy, a rural area outside Paris, was Le Corbusier’s answer to a French country house. Given relatively few constraints by the Savoye family, Le Corbusier designed a building to embody the architectural theory he had evolved in practice and in his book, Towards an Architecture 1923. He was inspired by both the classical forms of ancient Greek architecture and the modern technologies that were shaping the world such as automobiles, airplanes and ocean liners.

villasavoye_landscape2.jpgThis project was the last in a series of private homes known as the ‘white villas’ built by Le Corbusier and his cousin and partner Pierre Jeanneret, which introduced a new form of luxury in which space itself, and its capacity for leisure, were the valuable commodities.

Of these, The Villa Savoye perhaps best embodies Le Corbusier’s architectural manifesto, the five points of architecture. The first, pilotis – slender pillars which raise the building off the ground, opening up more space for gardens and cars, made possible the second, a façade free of its usual load bearing function. Walls were no longer supporting structures but ‘membranes.’ This allowed the unimpaired design of the third, an open plan interior, and the fourth, ribbon windows to flood the interior with maximum light and to illuminate it evenly. A sliding window system patented by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret was intended to offer superior ventilation, as well as give access to the fifth, a flat roof which could serve as a terrace. A curved solarium crowns the structure, the brightest increment in the layered design. This symbiotic relationship of these five features gives some insight into what could otherwise be a somewhat alienating notion of Le Corbusier’s, the famous concept of a house as ‘a machine for living.’

villasavoye_landscape3-outdoor.jpgUnfortunately the Villa Savoye presented its residents with its own host of problems, despite its pioneering design. Each autumn, as the windows ushered in a warm vista of seasonal colour, the family would write repeatedly to Le Courbusier, begging him to make ‘habitable,’ what proved to be a damp and chilly building. They complained of ‘raining’ in the hall, on the ramp and in the bathroom. The loud drumming of rain on the bathroom skylight kept them awake at night, heat escaped through the long stretches of glazing and the heating system was both insufficient and a further cause of flooding.

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Much of this was perhaps due to the fact that the technology involved was not fully developed at the time. As a monument to Modernism, the building possesses a poetry and sensitivity full of idealism. The careful composition of living space and intention to harness natural light, not to mention the building’s iconic aesthetic, still define modern architecture. Nonetheless, the discomforts they had suffered ultimately led the Savoye family to decide against restoring the property after the 2nd World War, when it was seized by German forces. About to be demolished by the local authorities to make way for a school, the building was rescued by architects and academics including Le Corbusier himself. Now a museum, restored closely to its original state, Villa Savoye is one of 17 of Le Corbusier’s buildings declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Credit: readcereal.com/

Beautiful Interiors on a Budget

Ikea isn’t for everyone but if you are looking for a soft minimal look without spending a lot, Ikea gets the job done. Some inspiration from Ikea’s blog Livet Hemma (Live at Home) today, with two very different living room looks. The first is a soft minimalism style living room created by Susanne Swegen. Inspired by her love of mixing Japanese and Finnish aesthetics, the space features a soft color scheme and lots of warm wood. The two-toned walls provide a lovely framework for the room, while mirrors are used to play with light and reflections. I absolutely love the recessed desk area with vertical shelving. Such a great use of space!

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The soft pink Söderhamn sofa styled against the raw concrete creates a beautiful contrast of textures in this living room setting.

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Styling by Susanne Swegen  / Photography by Andrea Papini and Emily Layefor Ikea Livet Hemma

Beautiful Furniture Design From Krakow

Kraków designer Alicja Prussakowska has designed a coat stand
that’s not only useful but beautiful. Its dual purpose design provides
storage and seating in addition to providing spot to hang your hat.
Made of handcrafted pine with a MDF base, I’d like one of these.
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Beautiful Bathroom Design

Most beautiful and unique bathroom
design I’ve ever seen.  The simplicity
of materials is beyond belief. I never
thought a bathroom could be so elegant.
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‘Level 45’ bathroom system by Naghi Habib for Falper

Beautiful Furniture Design

I would love to own a ‘Cloud’ table
designed by Anna and Marek Lorens.
Composed from a number of hexagonal
elements, the multi-functional table is
functional, beautiful, and playful all in one.
Made of plywood-and-aluminium it is available
in variety of configurations and finishes as well
as in a downsized, children’s version. I want.
Check out their website. They make some pretty
cool stuff.
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Beautiful Workplace Design

I admire the creative design work done by Studio O+A.
They just get it right every time. Their latest “Star Wars”
inspired office for Giant Pixel Corp. located in
Silicon Valley, echos a cross between the look of
Charles and Ray Eames’s workshop and The Jetsons.
To capture a 1960s-era, but still futuristic look,
Cherry and O+A designer Neil Bartley settled on a
spare office with a few marquee pieces, including a large
perforated-steel screen that makes up the entryway.
The screen reads the opening crawl from Star Wars:
“A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away…”
Check out all the wonderful work by Studio O+A.
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