Beautiful Winery in Napa

Seems to good to be true — you stop for gas, and find an oasis of pinot instead.
Napa has a new hot-spot, is Tank Garage Winery— an old vintage service station
transformed into a super cool wine country destination. It’s the perfect casual
road stop to try some new wine, take in the scenery or snap a few good photos.
Not a huge fan of wine in general, I’m more a of craft cocktail gal, but I love
the name, branding and use of old materials.

tank 1.jpg  2  6.jpg 5 7.jpg 3.jpg

Photography by ashley rose conway of craft and cocktails and ana kamin of california weekend via rue

Beautiful Hermès Reuse – Atelier Petit H

petith_portrait1

In an unassuming street in Pantin, the north-eastern Parisian suburb that has become something of an industrial hub for the luxury fashion industry, you’ll find the petit h workshop. Hidden off a leafy courtyard, the open-plan, well-lit room is a laboratory of sorts that houses the exceptional métiers of Hermès under the one roof. The mission here is to transform discarded items from the Maison’s many ateliers, and craft treasures from the odds, ends and off-cuts with the help of a roster of artists and designers like Christian Astuguevielle, Parme Marin, and Isabelle Leloup.
Read the interview here via Cereal Magazine

petith_portrait2

petith_portrait4petith_portrait3PetitH_portrait5.jpgpetith_portrait6petith_portrait8PetitH_portrait9.jpgpetith_portrait10PetitH_portrait11.jpgpetith_portrait12Photography: Rich Stapleton
By: Alice Cavanagh

Beautiful Reupholstery Project

photo4
In a recent post
I gushed about my obsession with blue velvet and it just wasn’t going away so I decided to do something about it. Enter an old worn out but very comfortable chair that has been the favorite lounging spot for no less than 3 dogs along with numerous humanoids. Not one to let it go to waste, I decided to reupholster it in none other than a vintage blue velvet. Seattle has many wonderful places to shop but is very lackluster when it comes to fabric stores. Somebody please open a fabric warehouse, but I digress. This minor hitch gave me the perfect reason to visit MOOD in LA and lucky me I got there 15 minutes before they closed knowing exactly what I was looking for. Not realizing how huge it was I could have spent an entire day perusing the place if it weren’t for my single-mined journey to find the perfect blue velvet; albeit an affordable one.

photo1

These images are before photos. A couple of things I discovered about the reupholstery business is; as a profession they are in decline but the flip side to that is the ones who are still in it have a long backlog of work to do and it’s not something you can “speed up”. My chair is at least 8-10 out before I can post after photos unless I get lucky and find someone who can do it sooner than later. I am so excited to see the end result.

photo2

photo3

Beautiful Googie Architecture

In 1953, Seattle artist Lewis Nasmyth was hired to “rustle up” a design
for a western-style gas station in Georgetown. Featuring a 44-ft. wide
cowboy hat and 22-ft. high boots, the Hat n’ Boots opened the next year
to a stampede of customers. In fact, for a time it was the biggest selling
station in the state. Legend has it even Elvis dropped by when he was in
town during the World’s Fair in ’62. But in the early 60’s, a new interstate
I-5 started diverting traffic away from the station. By the late 80’s it
pretty much looked like trail’s end for the Hat n’ Boots. That’s when some
Georgetown residents saddled up to rescue the soul of their community
established a permanent home for them in Oxbow Park.

boots2 boots3 boots-- boots 1 boots 6 hat1 hat 2 hat and boots 2 geaorgetown papatch p patch

Beautiful Historic Architecture

Trolling around Queen Anne Hill this week
inspires me to share an example of beautiful reuse.
Old Queen Anne High School, designed by James Stephen
in 1899, is a Neo-classical building that sits high atop
Queen Anne Hill in Seattle. Originally noted for its
spacious corridors, ample exits, and abundant light
and fresh air it was considered “modern” when it
was constructed. Today is houses, in all its
Neo-classical glory, high-end condominiums.
An excellent example of the adaptive reuse of
historic buildings.
photo1 photo2 photo6 photo4 photo5

Beautiful Antique Iron Bar

This is a beautiful example of reuse.
Back in the day when light bulbs were
new on the market, Germans had big,
bulbous machines for testing light
bulb voltage. Today these large, 1920s
machines are being re-purposed as bar carts.
Antiqued-Iron-Bar-Crafted-From-A-1920s-Light-Bulb-Tester-1 Antiqued-Iron-Bar-Crafted-From-A-1920s-Light-Bulb-Tester-3 Antiqued-Iron-Bar-Crafted-From-A-1920s-Light-Bulb-Tester-4 Antiqued-Iron-Bar-Crafted-From-A-1920s-Light-Bulb-Tester-5 Antiqued-Iron-Bar-Crafted-From-A-1920s-Light-Bulb-Tester-6 Iron-bar-2