Beautiful Lithography Stones

n 2011, while the REI store in the Puck Building in Manhattan’s SoHo
district was undergoing renovation, workers made an unexpected
discovery. Hidden behind one of the walls of the cellar were more
than 100 lithography stones from the building’s days as a printer.
They are now on display on the store’s lower floor.

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The historic building got its name from the magazine Puck, the first
wide-reaching humor publication in the United States, which was
founded in 1871 and moved to lower Manhattan in 1887. It shared
the space, in a mutually beneficial relationship, with its printer,
J. Ottman Lithographic Company. Their shared headquarters was
he largest building in the printing district at the time.

J. Ottman Lithographic Company printed many things beyond the
Puck magazines, including theatrical posters and board games.
Among the works now hanging on the REI wall are a high school
diploma, a certificate of election, and a mortgage bond. Some of
the litho stones are in rougher shape than others.

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Most of the writing and images on the stones is “backwards,”
standard practice so that the final print is the reverse of
what is seen on the plate or stone. Some, though, were
prepared for offset printing, which involves an additional
step between the plate and the final product. The inked image,
prepared “forwards,” or as it would be seen in the final
product, is first transferred to a rubber blanket, reversing
the image once, and then to the final surface, setting it right.

Puck continued to operate out of the Puck Building until 1918,
when it ceased publication. It was known for beautiful, full-color
lithographs and sharp political satire. Statues of the magazine’s
mascot, Puck, decorate the outside of the building.
J. Ottman Lithographic Company shuttered around the same time.
Other printing companies, and even another satirical magazine,
have called the building home since the original tenants left.

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During REI’s renovation, a deliberate effort was made
to repurpose materials from the original building.
Fixtures from the steam engine that powered the
presses are on permanent display, including two
flywheels and the governor. Nineteenth century
I. P. Frink chandeliers, newly fitted with LED lights,
help light the main floor.

 

Source: Atlas Obscura

Beautiful Historic Architecture

Meandering around Pioneer Square
one of my favorite neighborhoods
in Seattle.
lucknow
Historic Lucknow building. The building mixes
moderate-income residential apartments with
retail space on the ground floor, adjacent to
Waterfall Garden. It was the first housing
demonstration project in the Pioneer Square
Preservation District.

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Historic Smith Tower

 

Beautiful Architecture

One of my favorite buildings is recognized.
The annual American Institute of Architects’ (AIA)
Institute Honor Awards program announced
that King Street Station in Seattle, WA
has been selected from a total of 500 national
submissions.  The project is one of the recipients
selected by the AIA for excellency in architecture.
Congratulations to ZGFRead more about it here.
kingstreetaia

Beautiful Paris

This photo is so inspiring. I don’t know
who the photographer is but I like it.
The architecture+pattern is
beautiful. I definitely need to pay
a visit Paris.
[PARIS

Beautiful Historic Architecture

Trolling around Queen Anne Hill this week
inspires me to share an example of beautiful reuse.
Old Queen Anne High School, designed by James Stephen
in 1899, is a Neo-classical building that sits high atop
Queen Anne Hill in Seattle. Originally noted for its
spacious corridors, ample exits, and abundant light
and fresh air it was considered “modern” when it
was constructed. Today is houses, in all its
Neo-classical glory, high-end condominiums.
An excellent example of the adaptive reuse of
historic buildings.
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