Beautiful Funky Gas Stations

  1. This is the perfect time for a corss-country roadtrip. To fuel your wanderlust for a driving escape, here are a few funky gas stations you won’t want to miss along the way starting in my home town.

Hat and Boots started out as a gas station in Seattle, WA. The gas station is no longer but the Hat and Boots lives on at Oxbow Park in the Georgetown neighborhood in Seattle. Touted as the largest cowboy hat and boots in America, these pieces of massive rancher apparel made their debut in the 1950s in Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood as part of a western-themed gas station called Hat ‘n’ Boots. The 44-foot-wide hat was designed to hold the gas station’s office while the 22-foot-tall boots served as the restrooms.

However, in the mid 1960s, Interstate 5 was built through the city and spurred traffic away from the station. By the ‘80s, the trail looked bleak. When the gas station finally closed in 1988, Hat ‘n’ Boots sank into a period of decay and vandalism. After skateboarders cracked the brim of the hat, it appeared that Hat ‘n’ Boots would finally be put out to pasture.

Georgetown residents, however, were unwilling to let the unique duds ride into the sunset without a fight. The iconic attraction was moved to Georgetown’s Oxbow Park in 2003. The boots were restored in 2005; the hat finally completed in 2010. Plans are currently in the works to turn the hat into an interpretive exhibit brimming with the history of Hat ‘n’ Boots and its importance to the local area.

2. The service station in Ukiah, California, is made from the trunks of giant redwoods. The Redwood Tree Service Station was made from a 1,500 year old tree selected from the coastal redwood forests west of Ukiah. The tree was 250 feet high and 81 feet in circumference at the base when it was chopped down in 1936. It was painstakingly quartered, transported, reassembled, and cabled back together. A roof and canopy were added, then covered with redwood shakes. Two smaller log sections behind the main log became restrooms.

Nicknamed “The Stump” by locals, novel building has always been a popular Redwood Highway tourist stop and shutterbug magnet (that’s the whole point of lugging a massive tree out of the forest to the town).  When Richfield merged with another company in 1960 the Redwood Tree became the distributor for Rocket Gasoline: 100-Octane Ethyl! Times and demand changed again, and Jess Rawles bought out Bob Ford in 1962, and in 1972 the Redwood Tree began distributorship of Exxon products.

3. This gas station in Spring Hill, Florida, looks mightily prehistoric. This building will certainly get your attention. Harold’s Auto dinosaur was originally a Sinclair gas station in 1964, inspired by the Sinclair Oil mascot prominently featured in ads and on signs since 1930. Located at 5299 Commercial Way in Spring Hill near Weeki Wachee Springs, it shares a short stretch of Rt. 19 in Spring Hill, Florida with the Pink Dinosaur a few miles South. Dino, an “Apatosaurus”, stands 47 feet tall and is 110 feet long.

4. This gas station on Route 99 in Milwaukie, Oregon, photographed in 1980, was topped with a B-17G bomber named Lacey Lady, which is now being restored by the B-17 Alliance Foundation in Salem, Oregon. In 1947, Art Lacey purchased a B-17 Flying Fortress bomber plane that had been decommissioned when World War II ended. He flew it from Oklahoma to Oregon and then had it mounted on a building at his gas station. The 102-foot wingspan of the plane served as the canopy over the gas pumps.

5. This gas station in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, photographed in 1977, was inspired by the designs of pagodas. The Wadhams Oil Company gas stations were designed by Alexander Eschweiler. These small, red pagoda roofed stations were built in the Midwest between 1917 and 1930. At one time, there were more than 100 of them but there are only a handful of these buildings left.

One of the last pagoda-style Wadhams Oil and Grease Co. gas stations was moved from its original location at Federal Mfg. Co., 201 W. Walker St., which provided its fourth wall. The 60,000-pound pagoda, built in the 1930s, was jacked up onto a trailer for the move to its new home at 430 S. 2nd St., next to the Reed Street Station tavern.

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